Jamaica Information / The late Director/Curator of Liberty Hall, Dr. Donna McFarlane. + – Photo: JIS Photographer The late Director/Curator of Liberty Hall, Dr. Donna McFarlane. Story Highlights Retired University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor Rupert Lewis, has lauded the work done by the late Director/Curator of Liberty Hall, Dr. Donna McFarlane, in developing the Marcus Mosiah Garvey Multimedia Museum at Liberty Hall, King Street in downtown Kingston. This year’s Grounation, organised by the Jamaica Music Museum in collaboration with Liberty Hall, was dedicated to the memory of Dr. McFarlane. Addressing participants, Professor Lewis noted that the late Liberty Hall Director/Curator “designed a multimedia museum that would be of interest to young people.” To date, he said some 60,000 students have visited the facility.

Retired University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor Rupert Lewis, has lauded the work done by the late Director/Curator of Liberty Hall, Dr. Donna McFarlane, in developing the Marcus Mosiah Garvey Multimedia Museum at Liberty Hall, King Street in downtown Kingston.

He was speaking at the seventh staging of the Grounation Series held on Sunday (February 4) at the Institute of Jamaica Lecture Hall under the theme ‘Garvey’s Ghost: Muse, Cultural Arts, Aesthetics, Freedom Song’.

This year’s Grounation, organised by the Jamaica Music Museum in collaboration with Liberty Hall, was dedicated to the memory of Dr. McFarlane.

Addressing participants, Professor Lewis noted that the late Liberty Hall Director/Curator “designed a multimedia museum that would be of interest to young people.” To date, he said some 60,000 students have visited the facility.

He said the facility, which includes touch-screen features and documentaries about identity, can teach children about values such as self-esteem.

Professor Lewis, who has written extensively about Garvey, urged Jamaicans to seek to know more about the principles and teachings of the National Hero.

“We have to do more with what we have in order to make the principles of Garvey not only taught in schools but inform our thinking about politics and economics,” he added.

The participants enjoyed the presentation and discussion that followed, which explored Garvey’s life as a pan-African leader, human rights advocate and promoter of culture and the arts.

Attendee Claudette Williams told JIS News that Grounation “is a necessary intervention and a reminder of what we need to keep in the forefront of our consciousness”.

She supported a call made during the question and answer segment to include the teachings of Marcus Garvey in the school curriculum.

‘It’s foundational. It is part of who we are and what has made us who we are, so I think it is an excellent idea,” she said.

Miss Williams said she is eagerly looking forward to the other presentations at the Institute. “I found it very rewarding. I most certainly will be coming every Sunday,” she said.

Entertainment was provided by guest artist, The Mighty Diamonds, and the Nexus Performing Arts Company under the direction of Hugh Douse.

On February 11, President of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), Steven Golding, will examine the UNIA’s influence on youth, poetry and contemporary popular music.

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